Sunday, 29 December 2013

St Thomas Goring


I have been to this church before and taken photos but thought it time to revisit. It was the second attempt to visit this church as the previous day I found the battery dead. Some history taken from Wikipedia
"The Church of England parish church of Saint Thomas of Canterbury is Norman, built early in the 12th century. The bell-stage of St. Thomas's bell tower was added in the 15th century  and has a ring of eight bells, one of which dates from 1290. The rood screen is carved from wood taken from HMS Thunderer (1783), one of Nelson's fleet at Trafalgar. The church hall was added in 1901.
A priory of Augustinian nuns was built late in the 12th century with its own priory church adjoining St. Thomas's. The priory survived until the early part of the 16th century when it was suppressed in the Dissolution of the Monasteries and then demolished. The foundations of the priory church, cloister, dormitory, vestry, chapter house and parlour were excavated in 1892."




This is one of the entrances to the church




You walk past the village war memorial which I have always found hard to get a good photo of









The land beyond the wall used to be a priory for Augustine Nuns and was built in the late 12th century and was suppressed in the 16th Century during the dissolution of monastery's  after which is was demolished . Not sure about the houses you see now I thought them as almshouses.
Ahead you see the church of St Thomas of Canterbury to give it's full name




Seeing the whole church is not east with the trees that are in the churchyard. The church is Norman and built in the early 12th century




This is the other entrance footpath. It comes from the main road which is behind me.



 St Thomas looking from the south east side of the churchyard
The belltower was added in the 15th century 
 Here we look down the nave which was reordered a few years ago. I'm not a fan of this happening to churches but you can't say the place does not look like not benefited from the work done as it is light and airy
 The Rood screen you see used to be just behind the pulpit but was mover during the reordering. the marks where it was are still in the wall & floor. The Rood screen is carved from the wood taken from HMS Thunderer which was one of Lord Nelsons Trafalgar fleet

 The photo above was taken a while ago but shows some of the amazing detail on the rood screen 




The trees are from a Christmas tree festival and are dressed but local groups and businesses 
 This is the first nativity scene I have managed to get a photo of
This is the chancel now
Took this a few years ago 
 The chancel window which is one of the few stained glass windows in the church


Some of the decorated Christmas trees. The one on the left is the local scouts and on the right the catholic church which I might add and another beautiful church


Some one might recognise his name here




The Womens Institute banner and a brass memorial you can see in the church






 Found these interesting, especially the top one

Couple more memorials you can see, the left one is the roll of honor from the two wars the one on the right a bit older.










This tomb is in the chancel floor near where the rood screen used to be.







Couple of doors in the church, the left leads to the belltower and the one on the right is called the nuns door and was opened up to allow access to the new hall


The floral display is buy the belltower door









The British legion flags



With the name of one lost





The churchyard is quite large 



and worth a wander round to see the headstones




Even I did not realise it stretched back towards the road past the Lych gate 


The South side also ans many more older graves











I'll end with a couple of more interesting headstones.
Able Seaman B C Towerton served on HMS Victory in Portsmouth which was Lord Nelsons flagship and fought at Trafalgar and is still in service if not afloat. DOWS is listed against his name on a list I found so may explain how he died.












I saw the wreath first then read the name Capt E B B Towse VC you can read about him in the link. This was the fist VC I had come across in a churchyard

I hope you all have a Happy New Year.
Taking part in Taphophile tragics & Cemetery Sunday




29 comments:

  1. This church is a bit unassuming until one enters-love the history and the blue door. That the Rood screen is done from a bit of LN's ships is impressive as is the work in the screen, what a great post!

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  2. wow, what a great church. i enjoy seeing so much of it. thanks for sharing with us. i have always enjoyed the use of poppies in your memory wreaths. different than the US. very enjoyable post. ( :

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    1. Stems from the poppies that were seen on the battlefields in France, all the graves here get a cross with a poppy on remembrance day.

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  3. What an extensive post. Thank you for sharing. The interior of the church is beautiful. The cemetery is very interesting.

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    1. I tend to make them quite long as there is so much to cover. I need to get up to the church over the river next

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  4. What a marvellous blog; wonderful photos with good commentary.

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  5. «Louis» very much appreciates your detailed posts and looks forward to them on Sunday.

    Some of «Louis'» Norman ancestors accompanied William the Conqueror and fought at Hastings in 1066.

    You might enjoy this: Hitler's Firestorm and the Christmastime Salvation of St. Paul’s.

    Today «Louis» posted a workman-like Lutheran church in the California Wine Country.

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    1. Thank you Louis glad you enjoyed it. I read the link, the guy did not mention it all started when the Germans accidentally jettisoned bombs over London. The RAF then hit Berlin which enraged Hitler and he then Blitzed London

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  6. A very complete series on this old churchyard. Beautiful pictures throughout.

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    1. Thank you very much Don, much appreciated

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  7. Gosh Bill, wonderful detail shots of this lovely old church. It's an unusual architectural style with its rounded side complemented by the tower on the other. I love that you show us these old treasures so thoroughly, it would be impossible in one or two shots!

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    1. I feel churches need to be documented and a couple of photos really would not do it. Glad to enjoyed the blog

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    2. I always do Bill! Wishing you all the very best for 2014, looking forward to seeing many more of your finds!

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  8. I wish you a fantastic 2014 my friend! ;-)
    Gert Jan Hermus
    dzjiedzjee.blogspot.com

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    1. And to you also Gert, keep up the great work you produce

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  9. Bill, thanks as always for sharing your wonderful photos on Taphophile Tragics. :) Happy New Year!!!

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  10. Marvelous post Bill! Your photos showed this old church off beautifully. Happy New Year :)

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    1. Thank you Denise and Happy new Year to you as well

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  11. Interesting post. That church certainly does look light and airy, which I like in a way, but I prefer the dark interiors like the churches of my childhood.

    Thank you for linking up with Cemetery Sunday


    Beneath Thy Feet

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    1. Harder to photograph but not impossible

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  12. A lot of history in this church Bill. I like the sout east rounded end as well as the castle style bell tower. Very interesting about the timber from HMS Thunderer.

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  13. Happy New Year. Lovely to see the church with Christmas decorations

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  14. It interesting looking at the church bell tower almost like timetravelling. The top looks like its been added for defense as a lookout defending against maraders. Happy New Year, my friend.

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  15. Wow! Another amazing church!

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  16. Incredible to think of something so old still standing and being used. I love the walkway photo with the cemetery cross on the left, it really transports you.

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  17. Thanks for the little tour around the churchyard. Have a lovely week!

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