Saturday, 18 January 2014

The Holy Rood


Today we are going to jump in the Tardis and go back in time to the 15th century to a church in a village called Woodeaton. Now I happened to be in Oxford again after looking at the map and spotting a couple of likely villages to Visit I looked them up on Wikipedia. Woodeaton was the first one I looked up and the page had photos from this church (which do not do it justice) so I was sold straight away so it was a must to go and visit. I have shown a lot of photos so I hope you enjoy my offering now go get a coffee, sit down and enjoy its quite long.

On getting to the village you see the church on the left through the trees. The building in the distance is the Manor School




I took this from the gate with a wide angle lens, hence the distortion.










A grass path leads through the churchyard









Taking you to this wonderful little porch




A clearer view of the church



and a view of the North side of the church















Not seen a clock like this in a while, as you can guess it was a late addition being as the tower was built in the 14th or 15th century and the clock added in the 1700's















Not far away you can see this preaching cross on the village green which is 13th century













How about this for a welcome as you walk in the porch
Anyway lets go in and go back in time. Walk through the door and this is what you see.







A stone font graces the back of the nave




with home made produce for sale










How about these pews complete with little doors to them.











The walls are paneled and lined with a kneelers which were made by a couple of local ladys.





How about this for a nave with chancel arch and rood screen on the right is a wonderful carved pulpit, though the screened area on the right has me puzzled




Through the rood screen takes you to the chancel







where you can see this simple but beautiful altar




with a wonderful floral display












Turn round and you can see the  rood screed and choir pews







The pews have some wonderful carved ends on them





The rood screen is 15th or 16th century built into the 13th century chancel arch









Around the nave walls you can see these  heraldic hatchments










On the nave wall is a memorial to Trooper Albert Woodcock 







These memorials can be seen the nave  & chancel











If you look down you can see many of these memorials in the floor dating back to 1673








At the west end of the nave is this gallery which was locked off so I could not go up to get a photo from it






Turn round and look up at the chancel arch, either side are  heraldic hatchments and above you can see medieval wall paintings



Which can also be seen at the west end of the nave









You have to love the floral arrangements in a church




Outside take some time looking round the churchyard  and the church









Where you can see this sundial and if you look a long blocked up doorway




The south side by the porch are many old grave




And a few not so old



but it is worth the effort of spending some time in



The lichen clings to the stone after the words have gone while algae starts to cover another









Have a Peaceful Sunday.
Taking part in Taphophile Tragics & Cemetery Sunday
 


39 comments:

  1. what an odd place for the clock ... off center like that. i wonder why they placed it there? i love that they are selling home made goodies - that makes me wish for some for myself. ( :

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    1. Normally they tend to put them over the vent but the it was placed there is the 1700's Not sure I've come across home produce in a church before.

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  2. This looks like a really stunning church, Bill, and a real feeling for a bit of British history. It is also a fabulous post - you can almost smell the place! Is that tower as bent as it looks?!

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    1. I'm sure you would like to visit it the place if you were down this way, it's about 6 miles from Oxford

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  3. I picked a good week to come back to InSPIREd Sunday! Your post and pictures are fabulous. Thank you so much for taking the trip out to share this with us.

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    1. Glad you dropped by Sally look round some of the Archive there are a few like this you can see.

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  4. Hi Bill -- What a truly amazing post. We love visiting old churches and graveyards eveywhere we travel - especially when we travel to your side of the world. These photos are amazing --you have taken us on an amazing tour!

    It was so nice of you to stop by my little blog this afternoon -- the covered bridges experience truly was amazing~

    Vicki

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    1. I would love to see the covered bridges but I doubt I ever will but your blog show them to me wonderfully

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  5. Beautiful! I love seeing all these old churches & cemeteries that you post - I've never seen anything like those here in the US.

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    1. Nor will you, most of the churches in the UK are older than the US, thats not to say you don't have nice churches,

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  6. It's nice to see how people try to keep the place alive with flowers and all. Very special...

    Hope you'll have a great week Bill!
    http://dzjiedzjee.blogspot.com

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    1. I notice that at a lot of church's, they always have fresh flowers

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  7. What an amazing little gem. I love churches like this. Wonderful pictures, as usual.

    Thank you for linking up with Cemetery Sunday

    Beneath Thy Feet

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    1. So do I Nicola, I'm always amazed what is around near where I live

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  8. «Louis» looks forward to your posts, Bill. He thoroughly enjoys the detail you include.
    He is always surprised - though he should be accustomed to it by now - at how many of your churches have their rood screens intact. Rood screens are very rare in the U.S. - and only one church in Paris (to give another example), St.Etienne-du-mont, has a surviving rood screen.

    «Louis'» post today is Grace Cathedral, San Francisco along with the odyssey of Thomas Tallis' Third Mode Theme from chant tone to hymn to fantasia.

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    1. They seem to be in quite few churches I have visited but I am still to find one with a rood loft

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  9. That's quite an unusual church. Very simple but not without a rustic beauty.

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    1. Can't argue there, though I have come across many old churches this one was quite unique as I have never seen the like before

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  10. I love this- the wall painting looks similar to the one in Pickering- St Christopher I think- was it opposite the entrance? I love the font being used for sales of jam. I used to live in Oxfordshire but never visited this church, thank you so much for all the pictures. My Earl Grey was the perfect beverage to drink whilst reading.

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    1. Well I have not come across it before and wonder if it is because the are is prone to floodding

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  11. Wow - love this little church. Such interesting details on the inside.
    Liz

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    1. It has Liz and I'm not ruling out a revisit

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  12. This church has such a lot of interesting stuff. You are right. What a find. I love the general appearance of it. Sometimes I think churches and old pubs are the only places you get a feeling of real antiquity these days, people are so desperate to rip out the old stuff and put in wood floors and fancy appliances in their homes. One of the saddest things I saw architecturlly was a lovely old farmhouse with all the insides ripped out and replaced with something that seemed to have come straight from a magazine on interior design. Luckily such things do not happen so often with churches, these days.

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    1. I have seen a lot of "Reordered Churches" and though they look nice I feel the soul has been ripped out of them

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  13. Well to make a long story short I enjoyed this VERY much :)

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    1. Thank you Deb, I was worried it would put people off

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  14. I enjoyed this church tour very much. I love old churches and graveyards for the history and architecture. Wonderful post!

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    1. Must admit is one of the reasons I visit them

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  15. You did a thorough job of covering the church and its setting. I'm glad you were able to go there and did not have to rely on the wikipedia pictures. Well done.

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    1. Thank you Don, I never use Wikipedia photos unless they are mine

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  16. The floral arrangements are very prettty and cheerful. The simple alter- beautiful, I like the angle of the last picture of the cross with the pretty blooms at the foot.

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    1. I love primroses so had to get a photo, I'll use it on Wordless Wednesday

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  17. Faaaaaaaabulous post Bill.. Gosh I'm so glad I invested in a Nespresso coffee maker last week, this was definitely worthy of a really good cup of coffee :) one thing that is very clear about this little beauty is that it is obviously well loved by the villagers.. the fresh flowers, the hand sewn kneelers.. so many little touches. You really are lucky with these incredibly old and beautiful cemeteries to explore, love that you share!

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    1. These gems have a way of popping up and I just have to visit them. This was I think the best yet but I may have now come across another near Wantage which I will be visiting as soon as I get the Chance. The Kneelers are a common thing here usually done by the local WI, these apear to have been done by a couple of local women.

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  18. A beautiful, historic old church - much older than ours. Although ours, which was built in 1826, is the oldest one on the Island. We used to have doors on our pews too but they were changed a number of years ago. Thanks for sharing!

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  19. England is such a beautiful country. I hope that I get to go there one day *sigh*

    Lovely photos!

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  20. Bill, what a lovely find! And so many details to look at! Thanks, as always, for sharing on Taphophile Tragics. :)

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