Saturday, 30 November 2013

All Saints Aston Upthorpe


Last Saturday I popped over to a neighboring village to take some photos of a church but on getting there I found the door locked so I drove round to the next village and a church I knew was open. All Saints in Aston Upthorpe


I had been to this church before and found it one of the nicest ones in the area as it dates back to the 11th century though little remains to show this apart from the small window you see which is to the left of the porch and dates back to Norman times.







The churchyard is small being mostly at the front but you can see a few interesting headstones in it.





These graves are under the canopy of the large Yew in the churchyard





The graves here are at the other end of the churchyard
By the footpath leading to Blewburton Hill




Going round the south side of the church there is little to see apart from the blocked up Norman Doorway















Walking through the door from the porch the first thing you see is the old Norman Doorway now an alcove with a carving stood on a plinth.













 You need to walk to the back of the nave for tis view down the church



Just past the Norman doorway on the right you can see this old wall painting which was uncovered while decorating the Church




A little further along the nave brings you to the Chancel

 The altar decorated from Remembrance Sunday
We will Remember Them






One of the stained glass windows in the church and a floral display







 This windowsill was decorated also for Remembrance Sunday



Embroidered kneelers at the Altar rails




One of the family memorials to the Slade family


 




I like the simplicity of the memorials in the church.
Robert Slade is buried in the churchyard





 A sad memorial to Robert Thorpe Slade who died aged 11








A view along the nave from the chancel











The font and carved wood font cover at  the back of the nave, the bell ropes can be seen hanging either side
























 The wooden spire on the church which contains the church bells






Have a peaceful Sunday
Taking part in Taphophile tragics & Cemetery Sunday


28 comments:

  1. What a wonderful little church.

    Thank you for linking up with Cemetery Sunday

    Beneath Thy Feet

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    1. It is Nicola I also visited it's sister church today

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  2. What a lovely little place. I would love to spend time wandering about such places.

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    1. They are peaceful churches to spend time in

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  3. well aged old church. i enjoy the lighting & the steeple too. ( :
    glad to have you at InSPIREd Sunday.

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    1. Not many churches have spires like that mostly round here they are towers

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  4. These smaller churches beautiful in their simplicity don't you think Bill. It's almost easier to image how it may have been all those hundreds of years ago than the cathedrals, the memorials and gravestones have a more personal feel!

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    1. Most of the churches in the area I live date back to Saxon times so you can picture ho they looked

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  5. Beautiful steeple, and I would love to hear the bells ring out over the countryside on a Sunday morning.

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    1. I don't think it has many bells in from the number of bell ropes

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  6. «Louis» was looking forward to your inSPIREd Sunday post - he knew it would be a good one!

    He wonders if one of his Norman ancestors who came to England with William passed through this area.

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    1. Who knows Louis they could well have been. The Normans have had influence all round the area I live but you can see more if you though the archive of blogs I have like this one
      http://graveplace.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/the-aldworth-giants.html

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  7. The spire is very nice looking - it seems to have aged well! The bricked up Norman doorway looks much better from the inside than the outside.

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    1. It has aged well, most likely oak. I feel it's a shame it is bricked but you right it looks good from the inside

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  8. Indeed, these places have a lot to tell us!!
    Great job again Bill ;-)

    I hope that you'll have a great week!
    http://dzjiedzjee.blogspot.com

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    1. They do especally when they find hidden paintings under the wall paint

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  9. This looks a real peach, Bill. Great pictures too!

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    1. There are a few little gems like this rund wher I live

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  10. A wonderful series. Thanks for taking us to and through the fascinating church.

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  11. Bill, I'm still catching up ..... but as always, so nice to go through your photos and visit the places you see. I agree -- this place is a little gem!

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    1. I never posted this one , was going to leave it for next week. I visited the sister church last weekend so that is next.

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  12. Wow. Nice. As a bona fide taphophile from way back, there's nothing I'd like much better than to wander the ancient churchyards of England. Beautiful shots, Bill. God bless.

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    1. Wait till you see where I went today Jenny

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  13. As I said -- this place is a little gem. Lovely photos! And thanks for sharing on Taphophile Tragics this week! :)

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